Category Archives: Front Page

Lack of exercise ‘twice as deadly’ as obesity

Just 20 minutes of brisk walking a day may be all it takes to lessen a sedentary person’s risk of early death, says a new study. The researchers also found the risk of early death due to lack of exercise is double that posed by obesity and does not necessarily depend on being obese or overweight.

Just 20 minutes a day brisk walking can cut risk of early death in inactive people, study says.

These were the conclusions of the team that analyzed the data on over 334,000 men and women taking part in a large European study looking at the links between cancer and diet that also measured many other variables such as exercise and BMI.

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An hour of exercise a day almost halves risk of heart failure

It may be a no-brainer that exercise is good for your heart, but a new study conducted by Swedish researchers has found that as little as 1 hour of moderate exercise or 30 minutes of vigorous exercise a day could be enough to reduce the risk of heart failure by 46%.
“You do not need to run a marathon to gain the benefits of physical activity – even quite low levels of activity can give you positive effects,” says co-author Dr. Kasper Andersen. “Physical activity lowers many heart disease risk factors, which in turn lowers the risk of developing heart failure as well as other heart diseases.”

Vigorous exercise can consist of running, walking briskly up a hill, aerobics, competitive sports or heavy shovelling.

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Weight loss surgery linked to reduced mortality 5-10 years after procedure

Obese individuals who undergo weight loss surgery may have lower risk of death in the 5-10 years following the procedure than those who do not have the surgery, according to new research published in JAMA.

Researchers say obese individuals who undergo weight loss surgery may have better long-term survival than those who do not have the procedure.

Weight loss surgery, or bariatric surgery, is used as a weight-loss aid for individuals who are obese. It primarily involves one of three procedures: gastric bypass, gastric banding or sleeve gastrectomy.

During a gastric bypass – the most common of the three procedures – the stomach is divided into a small upper section and large bottom section. The small intestine is then rerouted to the small upper section, meaning the patient will eat less.

Gastric banding involves the placement of an inflatable band around the top portion of the stomach, creating a smaller stomach, while sleeve gastrectomy involves the removal of around 80% of the stomach.

Past studies have associated weight loss surgery with improved weight, quality of life and reduced risk of obesity-related conditions. In November last year, for example, Medical News Today reported on a study hailing weight loss surgery as “highly effective” for preventing type 2 diabetes.

What is more, there is an increasing amount of research indicating that bariatric surgery may reduce mortality among individuals who are severely obese.

However, according to the researchers of this latest study – including Dr. David E. Arterburn of the Group Health Research Institute in Seattle, WA – many of these studies have involved participants with few obesity-related diseases and the majority have been female. As such, the researchers say “the long-term outcomes of bariatric patients with substantial comorbid disease are not known.”

Results ‘may have broader implications for encouraging weight loss in general’

With this in mind, Dr. Arterburn and colleagues set out to assess the long-term survival of 2,500 patients – of whom 74% were men – who underwent bariatric surgery in Veteran Affairs bariatric centers between 2000 and 2011.

These patients were an average age of 52 years and had an average body mass index (BMI) of 47. They underwent either gastric bypass (74%), gastric banding (10%), sleeve gastrectomy (1%) or another bariatric procedure (1%).

To act as controls, the team compared the long-term survival of bariatric surgery patients with those of 7,642 individuals who did not undergo weight loss surgery. These patients were an average age of 52 years and had an average BMI of 46.

Around 55% of study participants had diabetes, the researchers note, while many of the participants had other obesity-related conditions, such as heart disease, high blood pressure and arthritis.

During the 14-year follow-up, there were 263 deaths among patients who had bariatric surgery and 1,277 deaths in the control group.

At 1 year, the estimated mortality rate for patients who underwent bariatric surgery was 2.4%, compared with 1.7% in the control group, indicating that weight loss surgery does not improve survival in the first year following the procedure.

However, mortality rates for bariatric surgery patients at 5 and 10 years were 6.4% and 13.8%, respectively, compared with mortality rates of 10.4% at 5 years and 23.9% at 10 years in the control group. This suggests that weight loss surgery may improve long-term survival.

Source: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/287582.php

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New Seminar Location! Columbus, GA

New Seminar Location available for our Clients!

We are very excited to announce our new seminar location located in Columbus, Georgia. We will be hosting a seminar on August 3 from 10:00am-11:30am.  At this seminar, you will learn about the various weight loss surgery procedures available to you. You will have an opportunity to meet our staff and learn more about our program. We look forward to seeing you there!

To register to attend, click here.

This seminar is located at:

Holiday Inn Express at Northlake
7336 Bear Lane
Columbus, Georgia 31909
706-707-7200

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